The Internship Programme is a great opportunity for students to spend some time abroad, either in London or Dublin. While the week is dedicated to work and gaining valuable experience in the field of your study, the weekends remain wide open for all kinds of adventures. Explore the city and its secrets, or why not jump on a train and see what lies beyond the urban area? Ireland in particular is known for its scenic beauty and breathtaking cliff walks. We have compiled a list of five day trips you should consider during your time in Dublin.

 An old Glendalough postcard with a view over the monastery.

An old Glendalough postcard with a view over the monastery.

1. Glendalough

Known for its Monastic settlement, which was founded in the 6th century by St Kevin, Glendalough is located in Wicklow Mountains National Park and means “valley of two lakes”. Apart from the well-preserved monastery, which sports a thirty meter high Round Tower as well as a world-famous gateway (the last of its kind in Ireland), there are beautiful trails around the mountains and lakes, including the Wicklow Way. The spectacular scenery, rich wildlife and historical significance make this a popular tourist destination and there are bus tours that depart from Dublin every day in case you don’t have access to a car. 

 Kilkenny

Kilkenny

2. Kilkenny

The town of Kilkenny lies a little further away compared to our other suggestions in this article, but is well worth visiting. Located in the south-east of Ireland, about an hour and a half away from Dublin by train, it is a picturesque place famous for its castle as well as rich cultural life and public gardens. We can recommend stopping by the gothic cathedral of St Canice or just wandering around the centre of town.

 A view over Dalkey Island from Killiney Hill

A view over Dalkey Island from Killiney Hill

3. Killiney and Dalkey

If you take the DART train to Killiney - not more than forty minutes from Dublin - there is a beautiful hike trail from Killiney Hill. At slow pace, the walk takes about an hour and has breathtaking views over the sea. The trail ends in Dalkey, where you can visit the local castle or grab a pint in one of the pubs. 

 Newgrange

Newgrange

4. Newgrange

Located by River Boyne north of Dublin, Newgrange is a prehistoric monument from the Neolithic period, around 3200 BC, and was sealed off for several millennia until the first excavations in the 17th century. Older than both Stonehenge and the Egyptian pyramids, it is considered one of the most important megalithic structures in Europe and can best be described as a large circularly-shaped mound. Inside, there is a stone passageway and chambers that once contained human bones and offerings. In Irish folklore, Newgrange is described as the home of gods. The easiest way to get here is by car or a private bus tour.

 Bailey Lighthouse at Howth Head.

Bailey Lighthouse at Howth Head.

5. Howth

Howth is part of the peninsula of Howth’s Head, an outer suburb of Dublin. Originally just a small fishing village, Howth has grown and is now a mix of dense residential development, quarries and wild hillside. It is only forty minutes from the city on the DART suburban train and has lots to offer in terms of pubs, seafood restaurants and scenic walks. Don’t fortget to check out the Howth castle - an often-used film location, where everything from from Jane Austen dramas to spaghetti westerns have been shot.

ADC College now organises the Internship Programme in Dublin, eligible for funding from Erasmus+. Don't hesitate to contact us if you would like more information about what we do and how to get funding. Call our Dublin branch today on +35 315 314 419 or send a message to info@adccollege.eu. 

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