The biggest fear of our students has to do with crossing the language barrier. It's normal to feel nervous and afraid ahead of the Internship Programme and often the issue is not a lack of knowledge, but a lack of confidence when it comes to speaking. But there are ways that you can prepare for your trip to London. Immersing yourself in British culture by reading books or watching films with English subtitles, are two great ways to get used to the language. So here's the second part of our British culture feature; we compiled a list of five London films that will inspire students before their big journey.

1. Oliver!

The musical adaptation of Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist from 1968 is considered a classic. The story of an orphan boy who flees the horrible conditions of a workhouse and ends up in London, joining a pickpocketing gang lead by the elderly thief Fagin, is here uplifted by an incredible soundtrack and iconic performances. Some famous examples of songs are 'Consider Yourself', 'You've Got To Pick a Pocket or Two' and 'Who Will Buy?'. Although the film sets were constructed from scratch (even the white crescent shown in the 'Who Will Buy?' scene), the story is deeply rooted in London and its winding alleyways. You can walk in the footsteps of young Oliver on a city tour, for example, or visit the Charles Dickens museum.

English level: medium
Place to visit: Barnet High Street (where Oliver meets the Artful Dodger)

Although the Oliver! film sets were constructed from scratch - even the white crescent shown in the ‘Who Will Buy’ scene - the story is deeply rooted in London and its winding alleyways

2. Bend It Like Beckham

Jesminder is a teenage girl from Hounslow in west London who loves football and sometimes kicks a ball around with her friends after school. But her family, who are Punjabi Sikhs and hold traditional views on what Jess should and should not take an interest in, are reluctant to her passion for the game. One day she is observed by Jules, a girl from the local team, who convinces Jess to join the team without her family knowing. A coming of age story, Bend It Like Beckham is both lighthearted and serious in tone and deals with the complex emotions of having a dual cultural identity, while also navigating the twist and turns of teenage existence.

English level: medium
Place to visit: Carnaby street (where Jess secretly buys football shoes)

Westminster Bridge, where 28 Days Later was shot.

Westminster Bridge, where 28 Days Later was shot.

3. 28 Days Later

Fancy a trip to an apocalyptic London pestered by a zombie virus? Then this is the film for you. 28 Days Later focuses on the bicycle courier Jim, who wakes up from a coma in St Thomas' Hospital just to discover an eerily empty city. After escaping an attack by an infected priest, he befriends two survivors and together they try to get to the heart of the mystery - is there a way out of hell? Due to a relatively low budget, the film crew weren't able to shut the city down and instead shot the London scenes over several days while morning traffic was held up for brief periods of time and clubbers kindly asked to find a different way home.

English level: easy
Place to visit: Westminster Bridge.

4. Harry Potter and The Philosopher's Stone

The story of the orphan boy who goes to wizard school hardly needs introducing. But did you know Diagon Alley actually exist? It goes by the muggle name Leadenhall Market, a beautiful Victorian building in the City of London. The curved entrance that serves as the Leaky Cauldron is actually an opticians, whereas scenes featuring Diagon Alley was filmed inside the market. So give Kings Cross and Platform 9 ¾ a miss and head east for a dose of Harry Potter magic.

English level: easy
Place to visit: Leadenhall Market

Leadenhall Market was used for the filming of Harry Potter.

Leadenhall Market was used for the filming of Harry Potter.

5. Fish Tank

Fish Tank follows Mia, a socially isolated 15-year-old who lives in a derelict council estate in East London. She has fallen out with her friend and practices dance routines in an abandoned flat on the estate. When her mother introduces a new boyfriend, a charming Irishman named Conor, her life takes a sudden turn for the worse. A film about class struggle and female empowerment, Fish Tank is still as poignant and beautiful as it was upon its release in 2009.

English level: medium
Place to visit: Tilbury Town Railway Station (where director Andrea Arnold first spotted Katie Jarvis, who plays Mia, when she was arguing with her boyfriend).

ADC College organises Internship and Teacher Development Programmes in London and Dublin, eligible for funding from Erasmus+. Don't hesitate to contact us if you would like more information about what we do and how to get funding. Call a Country Manager today on +44 2084249424 or send a message to info@adccollege.eu. 

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